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Dog rescued from car as heat turns deadly 0

By Penny Coles, Niagara Advance

Lynn Campbell watched over this little Yorkie for more than two hours Monday morning. The Lincoln County Humane Society says it doesn t take long for a situation to turn deadly for a pet on a hot day, even with car windows open.

Lynn Campbell watched over this little Yorkie for more than two hours Monday morning. The Lincoln County Humane Society says it doesn t take long for a situation to turn deadly for a pet on a hot day, even with car windows open.

A small dog rescued by local merchants and the Lincoln County Humane Society serves as a reminder to pet owners that hot summer days can be deadly for their four-legged family members.

Lynn Campbell and neighbouring merchants on Victoria Street were concerned for the well-being of a little Yorkshire Terrier left in a car Monday morning for more than two hours, and were relieved to see the dog seemed fine when a Humane Society agent arrived to rescue it.

All four windows of the car were open two inches, and there was water left out for the wee dog, but a car can heat up very quickly and become dangerously hot even with windows open, says Kristen Woodfine, assistant manager of the Lincoln County Humane Society.

A dog can suffer brain damage after being left just a short time in a car that is 41 degrees Celsius, she said.

When this little Yorkie was removed, the temperature was recorded as 61 degrees Celsius-way too hot, says Woodfine, although the dog was fine when turned over to her owners.

"We wouldn't have removed the dog if it wasn't in danger," she said.

"Whenever a person sees an animal and is concerned, they should call us. If they hadn't called in this situation, we wouldn't have known about it, and it could have been deadly."

Woodfine says in hot weather the Humane Society gets a few calls a day about pets left in cars. Often the owners are close by, and the agent can find them and explain they have left their pet in danger.

In this case, the agent waited almost an hour before leaving with the dog, a note in the window explaining where to find her. The owners didn't return until three-and-a-half hours after parking their car, and were faced with a bill of $115 when they went to pick up their pet.

Campbell, who watched over the dog as she waited for the Humane Society to arrive, says she worried that maybe she and the other merchants who called for help were over-reacting.

"We didn't want to be mean to the owners. We just wanted to protect their pet," said Campbell, who has a much-loved Yorkie herself.

Campbell, who runs an art gallery on Victoria with her artist husband Walter Campbell, says most Old Town merchants welcome dogs in their stores, unless they are food establishments.

She keeps dog biscuits for four-legged visitors, and some stores leave out bowls of water.

"Most store owners don't mind small dogs, especially the kind you can carry under your arm or in a purse. Even some patio restaurants allow small dogs on leashes, but ideally, when you're shopping, you wouldn't bring a dog along," she said.


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